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Scientific advances in gene therapy, stem cell research and artificial intelligence could all offer future treatments for glaucoma.

As swift and as silent as a black panther, the ‘sneak thief of sight’ struck. Glaucoma had been circling for some time and finally it pounced, reducing my vision and ability to see clearly.

One of the world’s leading causes of irreversible blindness, glaucoma affects more than 60 million people globally. It is mainly caused by too much fluid pressure inside the eye, which in turn exerts pressure on the optic nerve, leading to damage. Glaucoma occurs when the nerve cells that form the optic nerve fall susceptible to the constant pressure. It cannot be cured, but in most cases it can be controlled.

Unfortunately, even with the best treatments, a small percentage of people still go blind in at least one eye over the course of their disease. Recent advances, such as gene therapy, stem cell research and artificial intelligence are opening up new frontiers for glaucoma treatment, including the potential to restore sight.

new frontiers for glaucoma treatment, including the potential to restore sight.

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  • Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.
  • Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
  • Macquarie University
  • UNSW Australia
  • The University of Sydney
  • Sydney & Sydney Eye Hospital
  • Westmead Hospital
  • Save Sight Institute